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February 24, 2020

Invisible Kingdom (volume 1) review

Dark Horse Comics / Berger Books, October 2019 Writer: G. Willow Wilson Artist: Christian Ward Invisible Kingdom is a science fiction epic set nowhere near Earth, involving humanoid aliens. Looking back through our various reviews over the past four years of our site’s existence, we cannot find an example of a review where we applaud

Superheroes

Suicide Squad #1-2 (review)

Writer: Tom Taylor Artist: Bruno Redondo DC Comics, February – March 2020 We recently re-read American writer John Ostrander’s brilliant 1980s title, Suicide Squad. The concept of captured super-powered villains coerced into secret government missions still leaves us with the opinion that Mr Ostrander was engaging in the preparation and delivery of comic book haute

Independent/Self-Published

Nate Powell’s About Face (review): Law enforcement and The Punisher’s symbol

This critique is to do with Nate Powell’s About Face. But we start with this scene, written by Matthew Rosenberg, appeared inThe Punisher #13 published by American comic book giant Marvel Comics. It caused a sensation back in July 2019.  Some police officers in the United States have adopted The Punisher’s logo as a form of

Espionage

JSA: The Liberty Files – Revisited 20 Years Later

DC Comics: 2000, 2003, and 2012 Writer: Dan Jolley and Tony Harris: D. Clay Moore Artists: Tony Harris and Ray Snyder After a slight detour to review two independent titles and the final instalment of Doomsday Clock, we return to our exploration of espionage comics with JSA: The Justice Files, an out-of-continuity wartime adventure set

Independent/Self-Published

Disconnect (review)

Writer: Dan Hill Artist: Gav Heryng Mallet Productions Ltd, 2019 Post-traumatic stress disorder for military veterans is not confined to those with boots on the ground. The New York Times published on 13 June 2018 a harrowing story of a 29 year old drone operator’s struggle with PTSD: At night, he dreamed that he could

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Independent/Self-Published

Savage Bastards #1 (review)

Writer: David Galiano  Artist: Carlos Angeli  Mad Cave Comics, January 2020 The appeal of the Western genre is sometimes lost upon people who live outside of the United States. Traditional Westerns tend to romanticise the colonial creep of lawless Europeans across the North American continent. In 1878, when this story, Savage Bastards, is set, in

Independent/Self-Published

Supermom: Expecting Trouble #1 (review)

Writer: Gordon McLean Artist: Caio Oliveira  December 2019, Action Lab The superhero genre is a cavern almost completely excavated of anything of value. It is very difficult to discern any glimmers of gold left in the dark. So much of the material, with its parameters of good against evil, superpowers, ritualised combat, and fetished costumes, has

Superheroes

New Mutants #1 (review)

Writers: Ed Brisson and Jonathan HickmanArtist: Rod ReisMarvel Comics, November 2019 This title is refreshing. There is a breezy fun to New Mutants #1 that has not been seen in Marvel Comics’ often-grinding X-Men titles for many years. The New Mutants are a junior superhero team – “junior” in the sense that all of the characters

Science fiction

The Six Swords #1 (review)

Writers: Melchor Sapiandante, Matthew Perez, Chris Massari Artist: Ryan Cody AHR Visions, 2017 At a bar called “The Call Up” (appropriately so for a location which causes the main characters to come together), an assassin closes in on his target, only to find that he is the target of a second assassin. The second assassin

Superheroes

Batman #83 (review)

DC Comics, November 2019 Writer: Tom King Artist: Mikel Janin This image caused a stir on Twitter on 21 November 2019: The reason for the controversy? In Batman #50, which we reviewed some time ago https://www.worldcomicbookreview.com/2018/06/11/batman-catwoman-married/ , Batman and his former enemy Catwoman were to get married. They didn’t: Catwoman stood Batman up at the altar.

Superheroes

Happy 80th Birthday to the Sub-Mariner

In October 1939, Marvel Comics #1 was released by American comic book publisher Timely Comics – the very first publication by Timely Comics, which eventually went on to become Marvel Comics.  The issue featured what with the benefit of hindsight was the first comic book antihero, the Sub-Mariner, also known as Namor. (There is a tedious argument that Namor was published

Independent/Self-Published

Fizgig #1 (review)

Writer: Calico Davies Lead Artist: David Moreno Inker: Alex Bermudez Independently published, November 2019 For the past two decades at least, the large American publishers of superhero comics have been shifting the bulk of their publications to suit a much older demographic that what we would have been part of up until the late 1980s.

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Miscellania

A eulogy for Vertigo Comics

Eulogies do not ordinarily include a prayer for vengeance. This one does. Vertigo Comics was one of three imprints which American publisher DC Comics launched in and after 1993. The others, Paradox Press (1994-2001) and Helix (1996-1998), did not last long. But with the direction and oversight of editor Karen Berger, Vertigo Comics thrived. The

Crime

Three Panel Crimes (review)

Writer / Curator: Tony Fabro Published on Instagram Recently we received this message by way of our Contact Us page : I write a webcomic called @threepanelcrimes on instagram. It’s a different crime story told each week in just three silent panels. We’ve been going for almost two years now and have just over 19k

Crime

Broke Down and Four Dead Bodies #1 (review)

Orange Cone Productions, February 2018 Writer: Travis Gibbs Artist: Felix Novara  Two bickering low-level criminals pushing a ruined, shot-up car along a desert road, with four corpses arranged in the back seat, sounds very much like the opening sequence of a Quentin Tarentino motion picture. And indeed, this story could be the origin tale of

Historical

Manifest Destiny Volume 6 (review): Fortis and Invisibilia

Image Comics, September 2019 Writer: Chris Dingless Artist: Matthew Roberts Unless the memory of it is shoved in our faces, we tend to forget the salve with civilisation offers. Civilisation, opportunity, health, and social mobility are part of a journey, and in the context of colonialism, invariably had a nasty beginning. This comic looks at

Manga

Saint Young Men – an overview

Creator: Hikaru Nakamura Kodansha, September 2006-present Your reviewer recently visited Canterbury Cathedral in Kent, in the south-east of the United Kingdom. Thousands of luminous stained glasses windows tell Biblical stories in sequential panels. A visit to the Chapel of St Eugene in the Cathedral’s ancient crypt is just as reminiscent of manga and other types

Superheroes

Powers of X #1-3 and House of X -#1-4 (review) – a tale of civilisational evolution

Writer: Jonathan Hickman Artist: Pepe Larraz  Graphic Designer: Tom Muller Marvel Comics, August 2019-September 2019 Most of the Internet comic book community appears to be calling these titles HoX/PoX, because the two comic book series are meant to be read intertwined. We adopt the same nomenclature. HoX/PoX is a limited series published by American comic

Crime

The Love She Offered #1-3 (review)

Comics Experience / Source Point Press 2019 Writer: Glenn Møane Artist: Tirso Llanetta (Online review copy) Martin Amis’ novel London Fields has a pastoral title, but is concerned with murder, theft, betrayal and other dirty deeds in 1980s London. Do not similarly be fooled by the romance-themed title and cover art of The Love She

Humor

Scissorwalk (review)

Creator: Dr Machina Independently published, July 2019 This is not our first encounter with the strangeness of Dr Machina. In March 2018 we reviewed Single Cell, the good Doctor’s first foray – https://www.worldcomicbookreview.com/2018/03/23/single-cell-review/ . The introduction to this new collection, Scissorwalk, sums up the process: What Dr. Machina has done in the pages of the book you

Independent/Self-Published

Elk Mountain #1 (review)

Writer:Jordan Clark Artist: Vince Underwood The genre of the American superhero, perhaps, has its roots in repulsion. In the 1930s the United States was facing an ideological threat. On 20 February 1939, Madison Square Garden in New York played host to an assembly of twenty thousand Nazi sympathisers, who openly supported Adolf Hitler and the

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